#1 21 Mar 2009 11:46

Simon Sheppard
Super Administrator
Registered: 27 Aug 2005
Posts: 1,025
Website

Jeffrey Snover gets Distinguished Engineer

Congratulations to Jeffrey Snover, the main inventor of PowerShell

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/exec … fault.mspx
:clap:

Powershell is becoming a HUGE deal at Microsoft
All Microsoft server products are eventually to become PowerShell-compatible

Exchange 2007 and Powershell
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/libr … 23778.aspx

SQL Server 2008 and Powershell
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc281954.aspx

Sharepoint (next version)
Sharepoint 14

Distinguished Engineers:
http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/exec/de/default.mspx

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#2 08 Nov 2009 20:00

Jim de Graff
Member
From: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Registered: 08 Nov 2009
Posts: 2

Re: Jeffrey Snover gets Distinguished Engineer

My problem with PowerShell is that it is too easy to write code that nobody else can read. It is approaching the (lack of) readability of APL which mainly could not even be deciphered by the original coder a day or two later.


Sacred cows make the tastiest burgers.

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#3 24 Jan 2011 22:59

Simon Sheppard
Super Administrator
Registered: 27 Aug 2005
Posts: 1,025
Website

Re: Jeffrey Snover gets Distinguished Engineer

^ This is true if you write everything using Alias names and shortcut syntax.
If you want to make readable PowerShell scripts it's generally a good idea to use the full cmdlet names.

Alias definitions can be changed or over-ridden with a function, but if you use the full cmdlet name there can't be any possible confusion about what will be run.

When running commands interactively at the command line this really doesnt matter, but once you save something as a script it does pay to avoid Alias names. It also means that if in 5 years time you suddenly want to customise an alias, then you don't have to worry about it breaking a load of scripts you already wrote.

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